you don't look like a feminist

you don't look like a feminist

49,940 notes

My mistrust [of men] is not, as one might expect, primarily a result of the violent acts done on my body, nor the vicious humiliations done to my dignity. It is, instead, born of the multitude of mundane betrayals that mark my every relationship with a man—the casual rape joke, the use of a female slur, the careless demonization of the feminine in everyday conversation, the accusations of overreaction, the eye rolling and exasperated sighs in response to polite requests to please not use misogynist epithets in my presence.

(via nadiaaboulhosn)

#i have a hard time dating men because i have a hard time believing men respect me

(via underwaternow)

Pretty much. 

(via fuckingrapeculture)

Source on that quote is Melissa McEwan, since no one bothered to credit her for it.

(via misandry-mermaid)

(Source: shakesville.com, via misandry-mermaid)

2,668 notes

Miss Carter had suffered through cancer during childhood. It went into remission, she married, she became pregnant, and during the time of her pregnancy the cancer resurfaced. She told her doctors that she wanted chemotherapy [to prolong her life — her cancer was terminal]. It was a difficult decision for her because she had looked forward to this pregnancy. Her doctors, however, refused the chemotherapy, desiring to protect the fetus’ health. Again, similar to the Burton case, [the doctors] obtained a court order that would allow them to remove the fetus by whatever means necessary and to protect the fetus’ health. In doing so they decided on fetal health over attempting to save the life of the mother. The fetus was removed from her, and it died within two hours. Angela Carter died two days later.

What about the mother’s life? Part 2 of a Q&A with Michele Goodwin

this is a disability issue, a chronic illness issue, a traumatic illness issue, a feminist issue - this should disturb everyone.

(via disabilityhistory)

(via lesbianlegbreaker)

989 notes

We look at a little girl like Jada and we call her brave for speaking out against her own ongoing violation. She whose small body has withstood a behemoth of trauma is now expected to be publicly strong enough to fight an Internet meme proliferating faster than her own words can carry.

It is foolish to think that by devoting a few tweets or blog entries over a news cycle we are truly standing with her. It is foolish to think that standing with someone online or in a city hall or by a courtroom telecast on TV is affecting longterm change. I am often of the mind that girls who’ve gone through what Jada has don’t need us to stand with them. They need to be swept off their feet, hoisted onto our backs or shoulders, and carried.

~Stacia L. Brown, Carrying Jada

I love this piece. We should not expect young survivors to have to “stand” and be strong. 

(via jessicavalenti)

(via sugaredvenom)

2,031 notes

This is cultural bias in effect. General (generally white) audiences never question why characters are white and blond. If a character could be white, that’s usually justification enough. Whiteness as default becomes logical and comfortable. Only non-whiteness requires an explanation.
Indeed, if a character is not white, some people will cry out that their racial identity is the product of political agenda-driven tampering. If a character is white, the same people will comfortably assume that he or she came out of the box like that.
It should be noted that we’re not even talking about the broad US census category of “white”, which covers people whose families hail from Europe, North Africa or the Middle East — including many people with tan, olive or ruddy skin.
In comics, whiteness is predominantly represented by the pale pink complexions of Northern Europeans — the color once problematically referred to as “Flesh” on Crayola crayons, until Crayola changed it to “Peach” in 1962. Real world white comes in many shades, but in comics all white people seem to trend towards hex color #FFCFAB. (Individual colorists may of course bring more nuance to their work, but how many white superheroes can you name who are consistently portrayed with bronze or olive-toned skin?)
Superhero comics don’t actually favor whiteness; they favor a subset of whiteness that borders on Aryan idealism. We ought to regard that as uncomfortably fetishistic, because it’s an aesthetic that the industry has chosen.
All fiction is manufactured. Authors make their worlds and choose what goes in them. It is always possible to contrive a fictional justification for a character looking whichever way the author wants, up to and including finding a way to make a white person the hero in a story about, say, feudal Japan, or ancient Egypt, or Persia during the Islamic Golden Age. A white hero is not the most likely scenario, but it’s always a possible scenario, so in that way it always becomes justified.
The decision to cast Michael B. Jordan as the Human Torch has been called out by message board posters as evidence of an agenda at work — but white heroes in these non-white settings are rarely called out as similar evidence of an agenda. It’s all artifice, it’s all contrived. Fiction exists in service to an author’s design. All fiction serves an agenda, whether it’s articulated or not.
Andrew Wheeler, Radioactive Blackness And Anglo-Saxon Aliens: Achieving Superhero Diversity Through Race-Changing” (via fyeahlilbit3point0)

(via lavendersprigsandcoffee)

204,613 notes

lesbianlegbreaker:

thisclockworkheart:

grumblepumpkin:

rapunzelie:

sb5ive:

rapunzelie:

new undies: cute stretchmarks: also cute

No no no and NO stretch marks are never cute!! wtf too lazy to go get some cocoa butter and use it daily? We all have stretch marks but we can get rid of it.. People should take care of themselves and if cocoa butter didnt work for you make an appointment for a laser stretch mark removal dont be a lazy ass

hey quick question: what’s your fuckin damage

Because OBVIOUSLY EVERYBODY can pay for laser removal whenever they want, you huge fucking sack of garbage.

Let’s see… food, rent, medical bills, transportation costs. No, no no. LASER STRETCH MARK REMOVAL!
Priorities, get some.  

Tiger stripes! Lightning bolts! Growth tattoos! Rawr crash bang survival awesomeness! And cute. :)

rapunzelie , you’re adorable, and you’re killin it. sb5ive , a great big, wholehearted “eat shit” to you. You’re a fuckin visitor to this person’s body. You don’t own it, you have no fucking horse in this race, and you get no say in these stripes or their interpretation. Even if the $$ was there for laser stretch mark removal, lots of people like their stretch marks. Your body shaming makes you crappy. Suggesting that people shouldn’t / aren’t allowed to feel good in their skin makes you crappy. 

lesbianlegbreaker:

thisclockworkheart:

grumblepumpkin:

rapunzelie:

sb5ive:

rapunzelie:

new undies: cute
stretchmarks: also cute

No no no and NO stretch marks are never cute!! wtf too lazy to go get some cocoa butter and use it daily? We all have stretch marks but we can get rid of it.. People should take care of themselves and if cocoa butter didnt work for you make an appointment for a laser stretch mark removal dont be a lazy ass

hey quick question: what’s your fuckin damage

Because OBVIOUSLY EVERYBODY can pay for laser removal whenever they want, you huge fucking sack of garbage.

Let’s see… food, rent, medical bills, transportation costs. No, no no. LASER STRETCH MARK REMOVAL!

Priorities, get some.  

Tiger stripes! Lightning bolts! Growth tattoos! Rawr crash bang survival awesomeness! And cute. :)

rapunzelie , you’re adorable, and you’re killin it. sb5ive , a great big, wholehearted “eat shit” to you. You’re a fuckin visitor to this person’s body. You don’t own it, you have no fucking horse in this race, and you get no say in these stripes or their interpretation. Even if the $$ was there for laser stretch mark removal, lots of people like their stretch marks. Your body shaming makes you crappy. Suggesting that people shouldn’t / aren’t allowed to feel good in their skin makes you crappy.