you don't look like a feminist

you don't look like a feminist

66,085 notes

deux-zero-deux:

it actually is illegal. officers are required to wear their name tags for accountability purposes.
if a cashier can be penalized for being on the clock without a name tag, so can an officer. the biggest fucked up part about it is that you can’t even report it to their superiors because their superiors probably told them to remove their tags.

deux-zero-deux:

it actually is illegal. officers are required to wear their name tags for accountability purposes.

if a cashier can be penalized for being on the clock without a name tag, so can an officer. the biggest fucked up part about it is that you can’t even report it to their superiors because their superiors probably told them to remove their tags.

(Source: thesoftghetto, via feminishblog)

49,764 notes

tfcj:

All I can say is…wow. Not a good feeling. 
Officer Darren Wilson’s gofundme has more money donated than Michael Brown’s memorial fund. White privilege at it’s finest. 
I don’t usually post about stuff like this, but please share this in hopes of more people donating to Michael Brown’s family. You can find the gofundme page: here.

tfcj:

All I can say is…wow. Not a good feeling. 

Officer Darren Wilson’s gofundme has more money donated than Michael Brown’s memorial fund. White privilege at it’s finest. 

I don’t usually post about stuff like this, but please share this in hopes of more people donating to Michael Brown’s family. You can find the gofundme page: here.

(via proustianrecall)

17,152 notes

thebluelip-blondie:

aeon-fux:

postracialcomments:

Update, 4:30 p.m.: The ACLU, responding to BuzzFeed's Chris Geidner on Twitter, says that the officer involved in the incident described above has been removed from duty following a public ACLU complaint.

Source

But………..

this is great and all but lets observe the fact that the moment a WHITE journalist is threatened, action is taken…while Michael Brown’s murderer still walks freely and the police officers threatening the lives of black people/hitting them with tear gas and rubber bullets are still on the clock 

the media being threatened is the best thing that could have happened to white America because now they can stop caring about the majority Black citizens of Ferguson and start focusing on the white people being hurt

(via bubonickitten)

381 notes

Far fewer articles describe the other constitutional violations taking place on the streets of Missouri, and those violations are every bit as urgent as the infringements on speech and assembly. We’ve seen very little coverage of the use of tear gas and rubber bullets as constitutional violations. But the due process clause bans the police from using excessive force even when they are within their rights to control a crowd or arrest a suspect. And tear gas is in a category all its own. Not only is unleashing it into a crowd an unconstitutional exercise of excessive force, but its use is banned by international law. That’s one of the reasons Amnesty International sent a team of investigators to Ferguson. Similarly, the use of rubber bullets under the circumstances is also unconstitutional. Some kinds of rubber bullets are more unconstitutional than others, because certain types are more likely to injure and maim.

But excessive use of force is only the beginning. Pulling people out of the crowd and arresting them without probable cause (or for being 2 feet off the sidewalk) violates the Fourth and 14th Amendments, particularly when those arrests are disproportionately of black protesters. The general arrest statistics in Ferguson reveal what looks to be a stunning constitutional problem. According to an annual report last year from the Missouri attorney general’s office, Ferguson police were twice as likely to arrest blacks during traffic stops as they were whites. Emerging reports about racial disparities in Ferguson’s criminal justice system and the ways in which the town uses trivial violations by blacks to bankroll the city (and disenfranchise offenders) all represent constitutional questions. Why don’t we characterize them as such? These are not just violations of the law or bad policy. These are violations of our most basic and fundamental civil liberties.

Of course, probably the biggest potential constitutional violation of all—and eyewitness testimony suggests this as a real possibility—is the alleged use of excessive force by the police in shooting an unarmed 18-year-old at least six times. Under the law, each of those bullets must be separately justified, as necessary, even if one believes the officer’s story that Michael Brown rushed him. To be sure, the news media has covered this, but very few of us talk about the shooting as a potential violation of the Constitution. Remember, the Constitution is the foundational bargain between the people and their government, the framework on which our legal order rests. When we fail to talk about the arrests, searches, racial profiling, and government brutality in constitutional terms, we are failing to capture how profoundly the state has betrayed its promises.

Ferguson’s constitutional crisis: First Amendment violations are only part of the story. (via dendroica)

(via bubonickitten)

6,706 notes

kelsium:

I don’t think I know anyone with this background, but maybe we can signal boost. One major thing the Ferguson organizers have been asking for specifically for several days is for service donations from mental health professionals with a background in trauma counseling, people of color would be preferable for obvious reasons. If you know someone who might be willing to either to go to Ferguson or do tele-sessions, please direct them to this form.

(via dandelionchild)

17,023 notes

blacksupervillain:

jhenne-bean:

rabbivole:

once you start to notice these little turns of phrase you literally can’t unsee them 
'protests turn violent'
'clashes with police'
'violence breaks out'
'rocked by blasts', when referring to gaza bombing 
all the nice vague statements that carefully avoid mentioning an actor, because it sounds worse if you do. this violence just spontaneously started happening, it’s crazy!!!!
i’m really tired of it

loaded language and media bias

it’s even worse if you watch the 24hr coverage. CNn has literally been referring to the situation as “uprisings”. Uprisings, like we’re talking about the fucking districts rising against the capitol or some such shit.

blacksupervillain:

jhenne-bean:

rabbivole:

once you start to notice these little turns of phrase you literally can’t unsee them 

'protests turn violent'

'clashes with police'

'violence breaks out'

'rocked by blasts', when referring to gaza bombing 

all the nice vague statements that carefully avoid mentioning an actor, because it sounds worse if you do. this violence just spontaneously started happening, it’s crazy!!!!

i’m really tired of it

loaded language and media bias

it’s even worse if you watch the 24hr coverage. CNn has literally been referring to the situation as “uprisings”. Uprisings, like we’re talking about the fucking districts rising against the capitol or some such shit.

(Source: ursorum, via iflourish)