you don't look like a feminist

you don't look like a feminist

Posts tagged canada

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TRIGGER WARNING/ATTENTION: There is a serial rapist now out of prison in Ontario and he is using dating sites

lotsalipstick:

invisiblebee:

Please pass this around - he is currently in Hamilton. I want everyone to know his face and his name so they can steer clear of him and remain safe.

stay away please!

Very close to home. Pay attention everyone! 

(via thefistofartemis)

Filed under tw rape serialrapist hamilton canada afgstylz

9,338 notes

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Free Scarves In Ottawa A Helping Hand In Freezing Temperatures 

The so-called polar vortex has Canada in its grip once again, with temperatures plummeting down to -35°C across Ontario on Tuesday, reports the National Post, with Ottawa experiencing an average of -23°C. Going outside without a scarf is not an option, which is why one kindhearted soul is trying to make sure every citizen is properly dressed.

A picture posted on Reddit on Monday evening showed a statue of army hero Andrew Mynarski, tied with a purple scarf and a tag that read, “I am not lost! If you’re stuck out in the cold, take this scarf to keep warm!”

According to the Ottawa Citizen, scarves were placed on each of the statues in The Valiants Memorial on Wellington Street. 

Anyone in Toronto want to help me start this? It is FREEZING here. PM me if so <3

-YDLLAF

(Source: huffingtonpost.ca, via lesbianlegbreaker)

Filed under Polarvortex Canada

16 notes

garconniere:

bing bing bang bing by benoit tardif (available as a t-shirt here)
casseroles night in canada (facebook events)
nos casseroles contre la loi speciale (facebook page, french link)
short radio piece on the noisy form of protest (may 24, 2012)
ten points everyone should know about the quebec student movement (may 14th, 2012)
rundown of some important events at the huffington post canada (may 25th, 2012)
note: many news reports refer to the “casseroles” protests as unique to montreal (the province’s largest city). it is essential to note this has been happening aroundtheprovince, and did not originate in quebec (the cacerolazo are believed to have originated in the early 1970s in chile protesting against salvador allende’s government). there’s an interactive map on google maps where people can contribute locations where they’ve heard the casseroles protests.

Toronto, Ontario&#8217;s casserole meeting is tonight! Come out to Dufferin Grove Park at around 8pm - bring a noisemaker (pots and pans)! Hope to see you Toronto people there! 

garconniere:

bing bing bang bing by benoit tardif (available as a t-shirt here)

note: many news reports refer to the “casseroles” protests as unique to montreal (the province’s largest city). it is essential to note this has been happening aroundtheprovince, and did not originate in quebec (the cacerolazo are believed to have originated in the early 1970s in chile protesting against salvador allende’s government). there’s an interactive map on google maps where people can contribute locations where they’ve heard the casseroles protests.

Toronto, Ontario’s casserole meeting is tonight! Come out to Dufferin Grove Park at around 8pm - bring a noisemaker (pots and pans)! Hope to see you Toronto people there! 

(via dailymurf)

Filed under Casserole Toronto Canada

147 notes

thegrazing:

Canada student protests erupt into political crisis with mass arrests
More than 500 people were arrested in Montreal on Wednesday night as protestors defied controversial new law Bill 78
Protests that began in opposition to tuition fees in Canada have exploded into a political crisis with the mass arrest of hundreds of demonstrators amid a backlash against draconian emergency laws.
More than 500 people were arrested in a demonstration in Montreal on Wednesday night as protesters defied a controversial new law – Bill 78 – that places restrictions on the right to demonstrate. In Quebec City, police arrested 176 people under the provisions of the new law.
Demonstrators have been gathering in Montreal for just over 100 days to oppose tuition increases by the Quebec provincial government. On Tuesday, about 100 people were arrested after organisers say 300,000 people took the streets.
But what began as a protest against university fee increases has expanded to a wider movement to oppose Bill 78, which was rushed through by legislators in Quebec in response to the demonstrations. The bill imposes severe restrictions on protests, making it illegal for protesters to gather without having given police eight hours’ notice and securing a permit.
On Wednesday night, police in Montreal used kettling techniques – officers surrounding groups of protesters and not allowing them in or out of the resulting circle – before conducting a mass arrest.
Police immediately declared Wednesday’s protest illegal, but allowed it to continue for about four hours before surrounding protesters and making arrests.
Martine Desjardins, who represents more than 125,000 students in her role as president of the federation of university students in Quebec, said protesters had been “peaceful” on Wednesday’s march.
“It makes a lot of people angry,” she said. “We fear that tonight, because there will be more demonstrations going on, people will become a bit more violent, because as you saw yesterday, when you are peaceful, you get arrested.”
Police arrested 518 people at the demonstration, the largest number detained in a single night so far. Montreal police constable Daniel Fortier, who told reporters rocks were thrown at police, said most of those arrested would face municipal bylaw infractions for being at an illegal assembly.
“I was so so scared,” said Magdalena, one of those arrested, who asked that her last name not be given. She told the Guardian that she had been taking part in the protests since February, and that Wednesday night’s action had actually seemed particularly peaceful.
“This was one of the most jovial I’ve taken part in,” she said. “We were commenting how in good spirits we were, how everyone seemed in such great energy. There were families, children, women with strollers, which you don’t necessarily see at the night protests as much,” she said.
Protesters were allowed to walk freely and briskly through Montreal, she added, but that changed when they came to certain intersection, the pace of the march slowing dramatically. “We didn’t think anything of it,” Magdalena said. “All of a sudden you just smelled tear gas and could see smoke, and people were running.”
Magdalena said people from the front of the march came running back past her and her friend, who had been strolling with their bicycles. “We turned around and there was already a line of cops behind us. We tried to go on the other side but then there was cops there too.
Police officers then tightened their ring around the “hundreds” of protesters, she said, not allowing anyone in or out. Magdalena said this situation continued for an hour, before everyone in the group was read their rights. After that, it was another “hour or two” before she was detained with plastic handcuffs and led to a city bus. She said they were then kept on the bus for “hours and hours” and were not allowed to go to the toilet. “I have some medical problems, and I wasn’t feeling well. I really needed some water and I needed some sugar, and they were really awful, they said they didn’t care,” she said.
Magdalena said she was eventually charged with being part of an unlawful assembly, and given a ticket for $634, which she said she planned to contest.
Protesters have vowed to continue the nightly protests that began on 14 February when Quebec’s liberal provincial government announced it would introduce tuition fee increases over a five-year period. The Quebec government’s department of education, leisure and sport says fees would go up by $325 (£200) per year for five years from autumn 2012, a total increase of $1,625.
The protests have resulted in a backlash against the Quebec prime minister, Jean Charest, who has refused to back down over the tuition fee increase, and the new law.
Students have been boycotting classes over the past three months, arguing that the increases would lead to an increased dropout rate and more debt.
In response to the protests, the provincial government rushed through Bill 78 on 18 May. As well as the restrictions on protests, it suspends the current academic term and provides for when and how classes are to resume.
Some student organisers said that the introduction of the bill, far from cowing the demonstrations, had actually brought more support for their cause.
‘This draconian law has revolted me’
Mathieu Murphy-Perron, who has been helping to organise demonstrations against tuition fees since last year, said: “I would say that I’ve seen more individuals come out and say: ‘You know what? I was neutral on the question of tuition fees, but to bring this draconian law has revolted me and I will take to the streets with you.
“There have been more and more people who recognise that Bill 78 is a breach of the right of freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of association, and they’re not going to have it.”
Some legal experts argue that the bill contravenes Canada’s charter of rights and freedoms. Montreal constitutional lawyer Julius Grey told the Vancouver Sun that Bill 78 was “flagrantly unconstitutional”. Opposition has come from the Quebec Bar Association and the Quebec human rights commission.
In an appearance on NBC’s Saturday Night Live in the US on Saturday night, the Grammy award-winning band Arcade Fire, who come from Montreal, wore symbolic red squares of cloth on their chests during their performance, in support of the protests.
Murphy-Perron said the red-hued, four sided shapes were visible “everywhere you go” in Montreal, adding that they show the “inter-generational aspect of this struggle”.
“You see red squares on buildings, on homes, on children, on teenagers, on students, on bluehairs, you see them everywhere.”
Desjardins said that she and other student representatives will meet with the government next week in Montreal or Quebec City to discuss tuition fees – the fourth meeting since strikes began.
In the meantime the daily marches would continue, she said, adding that protesters were also planning a protest in Ottawa, around 150 miles west of Montreal, on 29 May. Ottawa is in a different province from Montreal, and so safe from the clutches of Bill 78 – introduced only in Quebec.
“It’s something to ridicule the bill,” she said. “If we are restricted to have a demonstration in Montreal, or in the province, we are going to go outside the province, to Ontario, and have a big demonstration there.”

thegrazing:

Canada student protests erupt into political crisis with mass arrests

More than 500 people were arrested in Montreal on Wednesday night as protestors defied controversial new law Bill 78

Protests that began in opposition to tuition fees in Canada have exploded into a political crisis with the mass arrest of hundreds of demonstrators amid a backlash against draconian emergency laws.

More than 500 people were arrested in a demonstration in Montreal on Wednesday night as protesters defied a controversial new law – Bill 78 – that places restrictions on the right to demonstrate. In Quebec City, police arrested 176 people under the provisions of the new law.

Demonstrators have been gathering in Montreal for just over 100 days to oppose tuition increases by the Quebec provincial government. On Tuesday, about 100 people were arrested after organisers say 300,000 people took the streets.

But what began as a protest against university fee increases has expanded to a wider movement to oppose Bill 78, which was rushed through by legislators in Quebec in response to the demonstrations. The bill imposes severe restrictions on protests, making it illegal for protesters to gather without having given police eight hours’ notice and securing a permit.

On Wednesday night, police in Montreal used kettling techniques – officers surrounding groups of protesters and not allowing them in or out of the resulting circle – before conducting a mass arrest.

Police immediately declared Wednesday’s protest illegal, but allowed it to continue for about four hours before surrounding protesters and making arrests.

Martine Desjardins, who represents more than 125,000 students in her role as president of the federation of university students in Quebec, said protesters had been “peaceful” on Wednesday’s march.

“It makes a lot of people angry,” she said. “We fear that tonight, because there will be more demonstrations going on, people will become a bit more violent, because as you saw yesterday, when you are peaceful, you get arrested.”

Police arrested 518 people at the demonstration, the largest number detained in a single night so far. Montreal police constable Daniel Fortier, who told reporters rocks were thrown at police, said most of those arrested would face municipal bylaw infractions for being at an illegal assembly.

“I was so so scared,” said Magdalena, one of those arrested, who asked that her last name not be given. She told the Guardian that she had been taking part in the protests since February, and that Wednesday night’s action had actually seemed particularly peaceful.

“This was one of the most jovial I’ve taken part in,” she said. “We were commenting how in good spirits we were, how everyone seemed in such great energy. There were families, children, women with strollers, which you don’t necessarily see at the night protests as much,” she said.

Protesters were allowed to walk freely and briskly through Montreal, she added, but that changed when they came to certain intersection, the pace of the march slowing dramatically. “We didn’t think anything of it,” Magdalena said. “All of a sudden you just smelled tear gas and could see smoke, and people were running.”

Magdalena said people from the front of the march came running back past her and her friend, who had been strolling with their bicycles. “We turned around and there was already a line of cops behind us. We tried to go on the other side but then there was cops there too.

Police officers then tightened their ring around the “hundreds” of protesters, she said, not allowing anyone in or out. Magdalena said this situation continued for an hour, before everyone in the group was read their rights. After that, it was another “hour or two” before she was detained with plastic handcuffs and led to a city bus. She said they were then kept on the bus for “hours and hours” and were not allowed to go to the toilet. “I have some medical problems, and I wasn’t feeling well. I really needed some water and I needed some sugar, and they were really awful, they said they didn’t care,” she said.

Magdalena said she was eventually charged with being part of an unlawful assembly, and given a ticket for $634, which she said she planned to contest.

Protesters have vowed to continue the nightly protests that began on 14 February when Quebec’s liberal provincial government announced it would introduce tuition fee increases over a five-year period. The Quebec government’s department of education, leisure and sport says fees would go up by $325 (£200) per year for five years from autumn 2012, a total increase of $1,625.

The protests have resulted in a backlash against the Quebec prime minister, Jean Charest, who has refused to back down over the tuition fee increase, and the new law.

Students have been boycotting classes over the past three months, arguing that the increases would lead to an increased dropout rate and more debt.

In response to the protests, the provincial government rushed through Bill 78 on 18 May. As well as the restrictions on protests, it suspends the current academic term and provides for when and how classes are to resume.

Some student organisers said that the introduction of the bill, far from cowing the demonstrations, had actually brought more support for their cause.

‘This draconian law has revolted me’

Mathieu Murphy-Perron, who has been helping to organise demonstrations against tuition fees since last year, said: “I would say that I’ve seen more individuals come out and say: ‘You know what? I was neutral on the question of tuition fees, but to bring this draconian law has revolted me and I will take to the streets with you.

“There have been more and more people who recognise that Bill 78 is a breach of the right of freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of association, and they’re not going to have it.”

Some legal experts argue that the bill contravenes Canada’s charter of rights and freedoms. Montreal constitutional lawyer Julius Grey told the Vancouver Sun that Bill 78 was “flagrantly unconstitutional”. Opposition has come from the Quebec Bar Association and the Quebec human rights commission.

In an appearance on NBC’s Saturday Night Live in the US on Saturday night, the Grammy award-winning band Arcade Fire, who come from Montreal, wore symbolic red squares of cloth on their chests during their performance, in support of the protests.

Murphy-Perron said the red-hued, four sided shapes were visible “everywhere you go” in Montreal, adding that they show the “inter-generational aspect of this struggle”.

“You see red squares on buildings, on homes, on children, on teenagers, on students, on bluehairs, you see them everywhere.”

Desjardins said that she and other student representatives will meet with the government next week in Montreal or Quebec City to discuss tuition fees – the fourth meeting since strikes began.

In the meantime the daily marches would continue, she said, adding that protesters were also planning a protest in Ottawa, around 150 miles west of Montreal, on 29 May. Ottawa is in a different province from Montreal, and so safe from the clutches of Bill 78 – introduced only in Quebec.

“It’s something to ridicule the bill,” she said. “If we are restricted to have a demonstration in Montreal, or in the province, we are going to go outside the province, to Ontario, and have a big demonstration there.”

(via khialest)

Filed under Montreal protests tuition hikes canada

481 notes

Ruby's Story: How a 7 year old got shut down for teaching about Residential Schools

apihtawikosisan:

Today, I’d like to present to you something a little different; an interview of sorts.

A while ago, a comment on one of my blog posts really caught my attention.  In it, a mother was describing an experience her young daughter had at school, and that brief description had such a powerful impact on me that I shared it with my own children.  They told me that people need to hear this story, and I agree.

We feel it is very important to get these kinds of stories out so that:

  1. those who are unaware that these kinds of things still go on, learn that they do, and perhaps understand how these events impact us and;
  2. those that have experienced similar things find out that they are not alone.

I contacted the family and asked if they would be willing to participate in an interview, to which they very graciously agreed.

To respect the family’s desire for anonymity, all names have been changed.  Here is Ruby’s story, in the words of her parents, and then from Ruby herself.

Ruby and Indian Residential Schools

(Today’s average Grade 2 classroom.)

Ruby was seven years old and in Grade 2. She was assigned to prepare a class presentation on the topic of her choice. The only requirement from the teacher was that the student know a lot about it. Students needed to prepare a poster at home and some research was encouraged. The students were to inform their teacher of their topic before they started their poster.

Ruby’s presentation date was scheduled by the teacher. She decided right away that she wanted to share something about her First Nations culture and background because she felt that the level of understanding and knowledge about this issue was lacking in her class. After much thinking, she finally decided that she wanted to tell the story of why she doesn’t speak her First Nations language that she loves so much.

(Children in the Chisasibi (Fort George, QC) Indian Residential School, 1939.)

Ruby decided that she wanted to share information about the effects Indian Residential School has had on her family and community in terms of language loss. Her eyes were moist with emotion but her voice was sure and certain. This was a very important topic that meant a lot to her.  She wanted everyone to know about how wrong Indian Residential Schools were.

A few weeks before the scheduled presentation date, Ruby and her dad, Chris, spoke to the teacher after school. Ruby stated that she wanted to do her presentation on Indian Residential Schools and how the legacy of these schools explains why she can’t speak her language. The teacher suggested she teach the class a few words in her language or about hunting or fishing.

(“I want to get rid of the Indian problem. I do not think as a matter of fact, that the country ought to continuously protect a class of people who are able to stand alone… Our objective is to continue until there is not a single Indian in Canada that has not been absorbed into the body politic and there is no Indian question, and no Indian Department, that is the whole object of this Bill.” Dr. Duncan Campbell Scott - 1920)

Ruby’s father then asked Ruby to say one more time what she wanted to share. Ruby wanted to share the reason why she doesn’t know much of her language, because of the Indian Residential Schools. The teacher then approved the project.

However, the next day after school the teacher called Faith, Ruby’s mom, into the classroom while Ruby waited in the hallway. The teacher said she had been thinking about it all night because she didn’t know how to say “no” the day before. The teacher said it was an inappropriate topic and had many excuses:

  • we the parents were putting our daughter up to it,
  • our daughter was too young/immature to tell her family’s story,
  • the other students were to immature to hear the story,
  • the students might get bored,
  • the teacher claimed to be too unfamiliar with the topic for our daughter to teach about it in her class.

The excuses went on.

Through all her arguments, Ruby’s mother quietly asked her questions. Had the teacher read the children’s literature about Indian Residential Schools that is available in the local library?

(A story about Residential Schooling which is appropriate for all ages.)

The teacher’s answer was no, to which Faith replied, “Well, our daughter has.”

Then Faith asked, how was teaching about Indian Residential School inappropriate when it was okay to teach about war and Remembrance Day? The teacher had taken the school to the local cenotaph and talked about war with the young students and this topic was not considered inappropriate or too mature. Faith reassured the teacher that Ruby would not be talking about sexual abuse in her presentation.

“It doesn’t matter what you say,” was the teacher’s response. “This is my classroom and my answer is ‘No!’”

Faith’s explained that the teacher would have to tell Chris and Ruby that the project was no longer approved. The teacher elected to setup a meeting with the principal instead.

(Another resource for teaching children (and adults) about Residential Schools.)

Afterwards, the two of us sat with Ruby  on the couch and talked about what happened. Ruby usually loves school, but she started saying that she didn’t want to go back. That is something we had never heard her say before. Ruby was very hurt and deeply grieved.

Her school had given her the message that her story is unacceptable and unimportant.  That she, because of her culture and how Residential Schools had had an impact on shaping her life, is unacceptable and unimportant.

Ruby was also very concerned that this would happen to her siblings as well. We spent a lot of time talking and crying together on the couch.

It was a very difficult time. We decided that we couldn’t be alone in this. As a family, we went and visited with people. At church, one lady who works with Residential School Survivors as a psychology councillor encouraged Ruby, and us, to not give up. We are so grateful for our community.

The principal mediated our meeting with the teacher. The end result: the teacher very reluctantly agreed to allow Ruby to share her story. We explained to the teacher that Ruby wanted to share about the apology and say a prayer for the Survivors. The following day, the teacher apologized to Ruby, but then told her that she had better not scare anyone or give them nightmares because of her presentation.

(Why deny that this is the stuff of nightmares? Children Ruby’s age rounded up in a cattle truck to attend Kamloops Indian Residential School.)

The day of Ruby’s presentation finally came. However, the teacher did not let her start the presentation at the appointed time. Twice Ruby asked her teacher to start her presentation. The teacher said the class needed to finish up more work first.

Finally, shortly before the end of school, she was allowed to present. The students were very interested and wanted to learn more. However, the teacher cut Ruby off and made her stop half way before she had even gotten to the apology or prayer for healing. The class was then given plenty of time to ask questions.

At the end of the question period, the teacher had nothing positive to say about Ruby’s presentation. The only thing said was, “You should choose a shorter topic next time.”

Ruby is hoping to share more about Indian Residential Schools with her classmates and is learning more about other issues facing Aboriginal people, such as underfunding of First Nations schools. On Valentine’s Day, she asked her principal if he would support the initiative to send e-Valentines to the government in support of First Nations children in Canada. The principal said that he would take a look at it.

Ruby’s experience, in her own words

As a mother of children Ruby’s age, I long ago got rid of any belief I may have had that children cannot speak for themselves.  It baffles me utterly that anyone who works with children could forget this simple fact.  My daughters were also very curious to hear Ruby describe her experience and I sent her a number of questions so that her voice could be heard as well.

I am very grateful to Ruby for her courage.  It is clear that this experience impacted her deeply and by answering these questions, she has been also asked to relive that hurt.

Below are the questions, and Ruby’s answers.

How old were you when you first heard about Residential Schools?

I think I was about 6 years old.

How did this topic come up?

When I was in Grade 1, my teacher said that I was only allowed to speak English at school. I didn’t know why people didn’t want us to speak our First Nations language. I talked to my Mom and Dad about it. Then my Dad told me about Residential Schools. He also told me about his hair getting cut off at school, even though he didn’t go to a Residential School. Then my Dad showed me the movie of the apology from Prime Minister Harper. When we talked to my Grade 1 teacher about it, she said that she was sorry about it and I forgave her.

(Shannen Koostachin of Attawapiskat First Nation showed us once again that our children are capable of taking leadership roles. Her dream was that all First Nations children would one day have equal access to high quality education.)

What do you think Residential Schools have to do with First Nations languages?

They took away our language by taking kids from their moms and dads. At school, the sisters and brothers were split up and couldn’t even talk to each other either. The teachers at Residential School thought their ways and their language were better. And now we speak English and do not know much of our language. Our family is taking a language class together now so that we can all learn.

What did you want other students in your class to learn?

I chose the topic of Residential Schools because people need to know about the past. I wanted to tell my classmates why I couldn’t speak very much of my language. The past is our history and everybody should know. Our class learns some history like Remembrance Day and wars, so we should also talk about Residential Schools so that it won’t happen again.

How did your teacher’s actions make you feel?

I felt mixed-up between sad and hurt when my teacher didn’t want me to tell the class about Residential Schools. Then when she did let me share, she stopped me before I could tell about the Prime Minister’s apology or pray for healing for people who went to Residential School. My teacher didn’t tell me anything good about my presentation, she just said that I should choose a shorter topic next time. But I still think that this was an important topic.

(16 year old Chelsea Edwards has continued the fight for equal education for all children in Canada, and is the Spokesperson for Shannen’s Dream)

How did the other students react to what you shared with them and how did that make you feel?

One student was fooling around but the rest looked serious and listened. Some of the students looked sad when they heard about Residential Schools. Lots of kids had questions during question time, more than any other presentation. It made me feel good that they were interested and wanted to know the truth. They thought that the Residential Schools were totally not fair or right.

Why is teaching people about Residential Schools important to you? 

No one is First Nations like me in my classroom. So there are quite a few people who don’t know about my culture or about the past. I think that all kids in Canadian schools should know about Residential Schools because this happened here and justice and truth are very important. I don’t want something like this to ever happen again in our land.

(Ta’Kaiya Blaney of Sliammon First Nation sings and acts, often in her Sliammon language. She also works to raise awareness about the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline and its potential environmental impacts. Only 10 years old, she has been speaking to adults and children alike about these important issues.)

Do you believe that you are too young to learn about or teach about Residential Schools?

No, I am not too young because I started learning in Grade 1. I talked with my family about it. I read Shi-Shi-Etko and Shin-Chi’s Canoe in Grade 1. Then later in Grade 2, I read more books for kids about Residential Schools. I know enough to teach others about it and I am still learning more about Residential Schools.

Is there anything you would like to say to other young First Nations, Inuit or Métis youth after this experience?

Be brave. It takes courage to stand up for what’s right. You may face some troubles, but it is worth it. Because you can do it with God’s help. The Creator gives us our culture and gives us courage. When I prayed about it, I felt better because I knew that God was with me.

Don’t stand in their way

A few weeks ago, I asked, “How do you teach children about Residential Schools?”

I think Ruby’s story tells us that we should avoid standing in the way of children when they want to learn about something, and when they want to take on the role of teacher.  There are many young people in our communities who have wisdom to share and the passion to lead.  They should not be impeded by adults who feel threatened by these children and by the knowledge they wish to share.

(The children of Attawapiskat also share Shannen’s dream.)

If we want our children to be invested in their education, we need to invest in them.  It sounds trite and obvious, but it is clearly a truism that has not actually sunk in yet.

I suspect however, that children like Ruby, Shannen Koostachin, Chelsea Edwards, Ta’Kaiya Blaney and so many others, will make it impossible for us to continue ignoring uncomfortable truths.  They make it impossible for us to believe that children do not possess wisdom, spirit and bravery. Children are not merely “the future” who can only make change once they become adults.  They are making change now.

Many, many thanks to Ruby and her parents for telling this story, and many thanks as well to those in the community who supported the right of a child to not only learn about her history and culture, but also supported her right to share that learning.

(via apihtawikosisan-deactivated2014)

Filed under residential schools Canada

20,794 notes

Abortion Funds by State & Province

dreadhawkedmuckaround:

fuckyeahsexeducation:

Alaska

Arizona

California

Colorado

District Of Columbia

Delaware

Distrito Federal (Mexico City)

Florida

Georgia

Iowa

Illinois

Kansas

Kentucky

Massachusetts

Maryland

Maine

Michigan

Minnesota

Montana

North Dakota

Nebraska

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

Nevada

New York

Ohio

Oklahoma

Ontario

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Virginia

Vermont

Washington

Wisconsin

West Virginia

Wyoming

My state is not on this list :( My state is horrible. For everyone whose state is NOT horrible, I hope this helps you.

signal fucking boosted, abortion should be accessible by all who need it.

^Boost! Followers, heed!

(Source: bebinn, via iamwhoiamandidontgiveadamn-deac)

Filed under Delaware Georgia Iowa Texas abortion alaska arizona california canada colorado florida illinois information kansas kentucky maine maryland massachusetts mexico michigan minnesota montana nebraska nevada new hampshire new jersey new mexico new york north dakota ohio